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  • Thursday, May 24, 2018 7:52 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Senior communities must have recipes on hand for any dish they serve—state and federal regulators require it.

    Yet most of these dining operations don’t take advantage of their recipes; either they ignore recipes or they don’t bother to obtain—or develop—good recipes.

    Don’t make that mistake; put your hands on high-quality recipes and use them. Here are some things to keep in mind:

    • Recipes should be scalable.
    • Recipes should give you both portion size and yield.
    • Recipes should include plating photos.
    • Recipes should call for fresh, high-quality ingredients.
    • Cooks should be trained to use a recipe.
    • If you plan specials, make sure you allow for time to find the recipes and train your staff.
  • Wednesday, May 23, 2018 8:03 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    When you bring a restaurant mentality to your dining service, you naturally bring down costs while raising the quality of your meals.

    Here are a few ways to make this approach work for you:

     

    ·        Cook to order. Give the people what they want, literally, and you’ll cut waste while increasing resident satisfaction.

    ·        Forecast your needs properly.

    ·        Make use of data from your point-of-sale system, if you have one.

    ·        Maintain proper inventory.

    ·        Maintain a proper production system.

  • Monday, May 21, 2018 8:12 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Senior living residents often share their thoughts without a filter. For a new chef, such filter-free communication, in the form of criticism, can feel harsh and be downright discouraging.


    It need not be. Criticism is part of the job; approached wisely, it can be an opportunity to improve residents’ dining experience.

     

    The first step is to understand criticism for what it is: valuable feedback rather than a personal attack. Next, make an effort to reach out. Tour the dining room and develop a relationship with residents; find out what their likes and dislikes are.

     

    Faced this way, criticism can become one of your most valuable tools. 


  • Tuesday, May 08, 2018 11:10 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Many communities describe their dining services as “fine dining,” buts this really what a resident wants?

     

    The term “fine dining” suggests low lights, expensive china, small groups and a fancy menu. Sounds great—on occasion—but imagine having nothing else. What do you do when you just want pizza, or a bbq, or some other comfort food.

     

    Instead of focusing on fine dining, focus on a fine dining experience. The experience should be superb even when the menu is down-home.


  • Tuesday, May 08, 2018 10:58 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Senior living residents often share their thoughts without a filter. For a new chef, such filter-free communication, in the form of criticism, can feel harsh and be downright discouraging.

     

    It need not be. Criticism is part of the job; approached wisely, it can be an opportunity to improve residents’ dining experience.

     

    The first step is to understand criticism for what it is: valuable feedback rather than a personal attack. Next, make an effort to reach out. Tour the dining room and develop a relationship with residents; find out what their likes and dislikes are.

     

    Faced this way, criticism can become one of your most valuable tools.


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